CyTOF Mass Cytometry Research Seminar: Harvard School of Public Health

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CyTOF Mass Cytometry Research Seminar: Harvard School of Public Health
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Tue 3 March 2020
Tuesday 3 March 2020
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Ended

You are invited to learn more about the principles, workflow, panel design, and data analysis on the CyTOF Helios Mass Cytometry platform.

Seminar Objectives

  • Describe the principles & workflow of the Helios™, CyTOF® mass cytometry system
  • Highlight key literature using mass cytometry
  • Discuss various applications of mass cytometry

Highly multiplexed protein analysis with Helios™, a CyTOF® Technology

Daniel Frederick, PhD, Application Scientist, Fluidigm

Abstract: Revealing cellular variations in perceived homogenous populations has become crucial to characterizing immune responses, understanding cancer cells, tracking stem cell lineage, and studying the effectiveness of biological therapies. Additionally, the need for antibody-based high parameter protein analysis is underscored by its capacity to identify rare and previously uncharacterized cell populations. This ability has far reaching implications in both basic research and into translational research.

Biophysiokinetic effect of NIR on inflammation and TTS in a noise exposed mouse model

Speakers:

  • Talis Reks, Research Technician
  • Devin Jones, Research Technician

Abstract: Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) is a prevalent condition affecting individuals that work in environments with high levels of occupational noise, encompassing not only temporary threshold shift (TTS), but often permanent loss of hearing/tinnitus. Photobiomodulation therapy using Near Infrared (NIR) has been shown to reduce inflammatory signaling in cells (in vitro). Given the inflammatory mechanism of injury in NIHL, NIR could be an appropriate treatment strategy that would prove non-invasive and cost effective. In this work, we investigated the anti-inflammatory properties of NIR in vivo through auditory brainstem response measurements, histological IHC, and mass cytometric analysis of circulating cytokines. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from whole blood collected from CBA/J mice that had been exposed to 98db for 2 hours. Treatment consisted of 15 min of 2.5 Hz, 3J/cm2, 805nm NIR irradiation delivered pre-noise exposure. PBMC’s were analyzed using CyTOF mass cytometry technology to determine inflammatory profile changes in treatment groups. NIR treatment resulted in a shift in inflammatory profile, notably a reduction in IL-2 and IL-5 expression, suggesting that NIR photobiomodulation may be a therapeutic alternative for the amelioration of NIHL.

About CyTOF Technology: The Helios™ permits the analysis of 40+ unique targets on a per-cell basis. This offers a broad and in depth view of a cell’s functional state, phenotype, and even cell cycle status combined in an unfractionated sample. The capacity of mass cytometry allows a unified analysis of limited sample to yield an incredible wealth of data. 

Registration

Register to attend this free educational seminar and luncheon hosted by Harvard University School of Public Health happening on Tuesday, March 3, 2020.

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huntington avenue 677
harvard t.h. chan school of public health, boston, 2115, ma, us
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huntington avenue 677
harvard t.h. chan school of public health, boston, 2115, ma, us
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